Product Breakdown

On average, acquiring new customers costs five times more than retaining your current ones. Being able to listen to your customers and creating meaningful relationships with them is the key to show you care and to retain them. 96% of unhappy customers won’t bother to complain about a dissatisfying service – they will simply defect. Research has widely proven that dissatisfaction mainly emerges in the immediate period of time that follows the sign-up to a service. By actively following customers during this period, and actively stimulating complaints you can dramatically improve your retention rates.

Have a great product that visitors discover but immediately bounce from? This inforgraphic from @neilpatel may help you understand why, and better yet, learn how to fix it.

Have a great product that visitors discover but immediately bounce from? This inforgraphic from @neilpatel may help you understand why, and better yet, learn how to fix it.

Good, quick list of inbound marketing insight

New product/service idea? @sgblank explains the 4 things needed to do to evaluate whether it’s worth pursuing or not

  1. Identify Customer & Market Needs
  2. Size the Market
  3. Competitive Analysis
  4. Growth Potential

On the relationship between usage habits and daily satisfaction via @nireyal

Just how big is the benefit from a daily habit? From the chart below, you can see a change in usage from occasional (2-3 days per week) to frequent (4-5 days per week) has less of an affect on NPS than the change from frequent (4-5 days per week) to daily (6-7 days per week). There is a disproportionate return on NPS when usage become someone’s daily habit

The first rule of research is don’t listen to users.
"The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgetten"

"The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgetten"

In an environment in which start-up resources are not limited, and no one can predict the next winner, and it is easy to measure customer behavior in great detail, the Internet is no longer a technology.


The Internet is a psychology experiment.

Building a product for the Internet is now the easy part. Getting people to understand the product and use it is the hard part. And the only way to make the hard part work is by testing one psychological hypothesis after another.

Remember something about attention. Yes, it’s possible to buy, grab, or even steal it. But it’s far better to earn it.
Baratunde Thurston, Help, I’ve been Growth-hacked! (via fastcompany)